11.2

Total sail area


The Boat


A ONE DESIGN BOAT THAT’S TWICE THE FUN

Sailing with a dagger board
or airborne foiling.


14

Flying Mantis foiling trimaran

Imagine


Foiling is here to stay. Developments in The America’s Cup and proposals for foiling boats in the Olympics are trickling down to the sailing public. Foiling has been around for years but until now it helped to be an expert sailor and not too large if you wanted to succeed. The Flying Mantis is designed to be sailed with a conventional dagger board that can be swapped for a central T-foil, to go foiling. Why not progress from one to the other?


…and it’s fun, even if it’s not an ideal day for foiling.


25kg

Approx central hull weight

Flying Mantis on side Dinghy Show

Portable


The central hull weighs around 25kg plus outriggers at 12.5kg each.


The Flying Mantis is designed to be rigged quickly. The outriggers can be fitted or derigged without taking down the mast. It doesn’t need to live in a dinghy park, which makes it easier to sail somewhere different each day.



Sailing with a Dagger Board


A great boat that any sailor can enjoy. It comes with an adjustable T-foil rudder to aid stability and control and a central dagger board.


This boat has all the advantages of lightweight carbon hulls, mast and boom that result in high performance and forgiving multihull sailing.



Airborne Foiling


The same as the dagger board sailing (DBS) version with an additional central T-foil, a conversion insert for the dagger board case and a foiling system to connect the control wand to the front of the bowsprit.


Designed to provide early take-off at lower boat speeds enabling more fun in lighter winds.


If the sailing conditions are not great for foiling, it’s easy to convert back to dagger board sailing.



The Hulls


The 3 hulls are quick and easy to assemble, and are extremely light so less power is needed to drive the Flying Mantis forward. A relatively flat underside minimises time in the water, generating hydrodynamic lift. The U-shaped hull maximises displacement as the boat drops off the foils.


The hulls are an epoxy sandwich carbon construction with a painted and lacquered finish that weighs less than the usual gel coat. Hull colour is customisable. The high performance, lightweight construction of the Flying Mantis means that this boat should not be run up onto or dragged along a beach.


Flying Mantis Foils

The Foils


The central and rudder T-foils can be lifted to help launch/recover from a beach. The control wand is attached to the end of a bowsprit, well forward of the central foil and close to the water. Being forward (rather than trailing) enables control of the pitch and ride height, and eliminates flow distortion from the centre foil.


The twist-grip tiller controls the angle of the rudder T-foil, giving positive lift upwind and negative lift downwind, (less chance of pitch-poling).



The Sails


Designed in conjunction with North Sails.


The addition of a jib to the main helps to keep the centre of effort low and balanced.


2.5m

Outrigger length

Flying Mantis debut launch london boat show foiling trimaran dinghy sailing

The Rig


The rigging is designed to be set-up and dismantled as quickly as possible. For example, the trampolines are partly secured using velcro fixings which are simple but effective. The idea of simplicity extends to the layout of the sheets and lines, and the use of a Gnav instead of a kicker/vang, helping to keep the deck clear.


Flying Mantis Carbon Fibre view outrigger

Safety


Read this. No, really read this.


“The challenge of sailing is knowing your limitations and being able to judge when you are exceeding them” Martin Kenny, Tynemouth lifeboat.


Follow the guidance on safe sailing and make sure you are prepared. Do not go sailing if no-one knows where you are and you have no means of rescue. The Flying Mantis is a performance craft. Wear protective clothing. Have fun.



11.2

Total sail area


The Boat


A ONE DESIGN BOAT THAT’S TWICE THE FUN

Sailing with a dagger board
or airborne foiling.


14

Flying Mantis foiling trimaran

Imagine


Foiling is here to stay. Developments in The America’s Cup and proposals for foiling boats in the Olympics are trickling down to the sailing public. Foiling has been around for years but until now it helped to be an expert sailor and not too large if you wanted to succeed. The Flying Mantis is designed to be sailed with a conventional dagger board that can be swapped for a central T-foil, to go foiling. Why not progress from one to the other?


…and it’s fun, even if it’s not an ideal day for foiling.


25kg

Approx central hull weight

Flying Mantis on side Dinghy Show

Portable


The central hull weighs around 25kg plus outriggers at 12.5kg each.


The Flying Mantis is designed to be rigged quickly. The outriggers can be fitted or derigged without taking down the mast. It doesn’t need to live in a dinghy park, which makes it easier to sail somewhere different each day.



Sailing with a Dagger Board


A great boat that any sailor can enjoy. It comes with an adjustable T-foil rudder to aid stability and control and a central dagger board.


This boat has all the advantages of lightweight carbon hulls, mast and boom that result in high performance and forgiving multihull sailing.



Airborne Foiling


The same as the dagger board sailing (DBS) version with an additional central T-foil, a conversion insert for the dagger board case and a foiling system to connect the control wand to the front of the bowsprit.


Designed to provide early take-off at lower boat speeds enabling more fun in lighter winds.


If the sailing conditions are not great for foiling, it’s easy to convert back to dagger board sailing.



The Hulls


The 3 hulls are quick and easy to assemble, and are extremely light so less power is needed to drive the Flying Mantis forward. A relatively flat underside minimises time in the water, generating hydrodynamic lift. The U-shaped hull maximises displacement as the boat drops off the foils.


The hulls are an epoxy sandwich carbon construction with a painted and lacquered finish that weighs less than the usual gel coat. Hull colour is customisable. The high performance, lightweight construction of the Flying Mantis means that this boat should not be run up onto or dragged along a beach.


Flying Mantis Foils

The Foils


The central and rudder T-foils can be lifted to help launch/recover from a beach. The control wand is attached to the end of a bowsprit, well forward of the central foil and close to the water. Being forward (rather than trailing) enables control of the pitch and ride height, and eliminates flow distortion from the centre foil.


The twist-grip tiller controls the angle of the rudder T-foil, giving positive lift upwind and negative lift downwind, (less chance of pitch-poling).



The Sails


Designed in conjunction with North Sails.


The addition of a jib to the main helps to keep the centre of effort low and balanced.


2.5m

Outrigger length

Flying Mantis debut launch london boat show foiling trimaran dinghy sailing

The Rig


The rigging is designed to be set-up and dismantled as quickly as possible. For example, the trampolines are partly secured using velcro fixings which are simple but effective. The idea of simplicity extends to the layout of the sheets and lines, and the use of a Gnav instead of a kicker/vang, helping to keep the deck clear.


Flying Mantis Carbon Fibre view outrigger

Safety


Read this. No, really read this.


“The challenge of sailing is knowing your limitations and being able to judge when you are exceeding them” Martin Kenny, Tynemouth lifeboat.


Follow the guidance on safe sailing and make sure you are prepared. Do not go sailing if no-one knows where you are and you have no means of rescue. The Flying Mantis is a performance craft. Wear protective clothing. Have fun.



The Boat


A ONE DESIGN BOAT THAT’S TWICE THE FUN

Sailing with a dagger board
or airborne foiling.

11.2

Total sail area


14

Flying Mantis foiling trimaran

Imagine


Foiling is here to stay. Developments in The America’s Cup and proposals for foiling boats in the Olympics are trickling down to the sailing public. Foiling has been around for years but until now it helped to be an expert sailor and not too large if you wanted to succeed. The Flying Mantis is designed to be sailed with a conventional dagger board that can be swapped for a central T-foil, to go foiling. Why not progress from one to the other?


…and it’s fun, even if it’s not an ideal day for foiling.


Portable


The central hull weighs around 25kg plus outriggers at 12.5kg each.


The Flying Mantis is designed to be rigged quickly. The outriggers can be fitted or derigged without taking down the mast. It doesn’t need to live in a dinghy park, which makes it easier to sail somewhere different each day.

25kg

Approx central hull weight

Flying Mantis on side Dinghy Show

Sailing with a Dagger Board


A great boat that any sailor can enjoy. It comes with an adjustable T-foil rudder to aid stability and control and a central dagger board.


This boat has all the advantages of lightweight carbon hulls, mast and boom that result in high performance and forgiving multihull sailing.


Airborne Foiling


The same as the dagger board sailing (DBS) version with an additional central T-foil, a conversion insert for the dagger board case and a foiling system to connect the control wand to the front of the bowsprit.


Designed to provide early take-off at lower boat speeds enabling more fun in lighter winds.


If the sailing conditions are not great for foiling, it’s easy to convert back to dagger board sailing.


The Hulls


The 3 hulls are quick and easy to assemble, and are extremely light so less power is needed to drive the Flying Mantis forward. A relatively flat underside minimises time in the water, generating hydrodynamic lift. The U-shaped hull maximises displacement as the boat drops off the foils.


The hulls are an epoxy sandwich carbon construction with a painted and lacquered finish that weighs less than the usual gel coat. Hull colour is customisable. The high performance, lightweight construction of the Flying Mantis means that this boat should not be run up onto or dragged along a beach.


The Foils


The central and rudder T-foils can be lifted to help launch/recover from a beach. The control wand is attached to the end of a bowsprit, well forward of the central foil and close to the water. Being forward (rather than trailing) enables control of the pitch and ride height, and eliminates flow distortion from the centre foil.


The twist-grip tiller controls the angle of the rudder T-foil, giving positive lift upwind and negative lift downwind, (less chance of pitch-poling).

Flying Mantis Foils

The Sails


Designed in conjunction with North Sails.


The addition of a jib to the main helps to keep the centre of effort low and balanced.


The Rig


The rigging is designed to be set-up and dismantled as quickly as possible. For example, the trampolines are partly secured using velcro fixings which are simple but effective. The idea of simplicity extends to the layout of the sheets and lines, and the use of a Gnav instead of a kicker/vang, helping to keep the deck clear.

2.5m

Outrigger length

Flying Mantis debut launch london boat show foiling trimaran dinghy sailing

Flying Mantis Carbon Fibre view outrigger

Safety


Read this. No, really read this.


“The challenge of sailing is knowing your limitations and being able to judge when you are exceeding them” Martin Kenny, Tynemouth lifeboat.


Follow the guidance on safe sailing and make sure you are prepared. Do not go sailing if no-one knows where you are and you have no means of rescue. The Flying Mantis is a performance craft. Wear protective clothing. Have fun.



The Boat


A ONE DESIGN BOAT THAT’S TWICE THE FUN

Sailing with a dagger board
or airborne foiling.

11.2

Total sail area


14

Flying Mantis foiling trimaran

Imagine


Foiling is here to stay. Developments in The America’s Cup and proposals for foiling boats in the Olympics are trickling down to the sailing public. Foiling has been around for years but until now it helped to be an expert sailor and not too large if you wanted to succeed. The Flying Mantis is designed to be sailed with a conventional dagger board that can be swapped for a central T-foil, to go foiling. Why not progress from one to the other?


…and it’s fun, even if it’s not an ideal day for foiling.


Portable


The central hull weighs around 25kg plus outriggers at 12.5kg each.


The Flying Mantis is designed to be rigged quickly. The outriggers can be fitted or derigged without taking down the mast. It doesn’t need to live in a dinghy park, which makes it easier to sail somewhere different each day.

25kg

Approx central hull weight

Flying Mantis on side Dinghy Show

Sailing with a Dagger Board


A great boat that any sailor can enjoy. It comes with an adjustable T-foil rudder to aid stability and control and a central dagger board.


This boat has all the advantages of lightweight carbon hulls, mast and boom that result in high performance and forgiving multihull sailing.


Airborne Foiling


The same as the dagger board sailing (DBS) version with an additional central T-foil, a conversion insert for the dagger board case and a foiling system to connect the control wand to the front of the bowsprit.


Designed to provide early take-off at lower boat speeds enabling more fun in lighter winds.


If the sailing conditions are not great for foiling, it’s easy to convert back to dagger board sailing.


The Hulls


The 3 hulls are quick and easy to assemble, and are extremely light so less power is needed to drive the Flying Mantis forward. A relatively flat underside minimises time in the water, generating hydrodynamic lift. The U-shaped hull maximises displacement as the boat drops off the foils.


The hulls are an epoxy sandwich carbon construction with a painted and lacquered finish that weighs less than the usual gel coat. Hull colour is customisable. The high performance, lightweight construction of the Flying Mantis means that this boat should not be run up onto or dragged along a beach.


The Foils


The central and rudder T-foils can be lifted to help launch/recover from a beach. The control wand is attached to the end of a bowsprit, well forward of the central foil and close to the water. Being forward (rather than trailing) enables control of the pitch and ride height, and eliminates flow distortion from the centre foil.


The twist-grip tiller controls the angle of the rudder T-foil, giving positive lift upwind and negative lift downwind, (less chance of pitch-poling).

Flying Mantis Foils

The Sails


Designed in conjunction with North Sails.


The addition of a jib to the main helps to keep the centre of effort low and balanced.


The Rig


The rigging is designed to be set-up and dismantled as quickly as possible. For example, the trampolines are partly secured using velcro fixings which are simple but effective. The idea of simplicity extends to the layout of the sheets and lines, and the use of a Gnav instead of a kicker/vang, helping to keep the deck clear.

2.5m

Outrigger length

Flying Mantis debut launch london boat show foiling trimaran dinghy sailing

Flying Mantis Carbon Fibre view outrigger

Safety


Read this. No, really read this.


“The challenge of sailing is knowing your limitations and being able to judge when you are exceeding them” Martin Kenny, Tynemouth lifeboat.


Follow the guidance on safe sailing and make sure you are prepared. Do not go sailing if no-one knows where you are and you have no means of rescue. The Flying Mantis is a performance craft. Wear protective clothing. Have fun.